FOR CURRENT &
FUTURE AIRCRAFT VALUES

Values of Older Turboprops Fare Better Than New

April 15, 2019

The market for older turboprops has a measure of resilience that sometimes eludes the newer turboprops not least because the type of aircraft is no longer in production.

The price of fuel has done nothing to quell the demand for used turboprops and indeed for new examples. Lower fuel prices generally mean that jets become more efficient over shorter sector lengths but operators cannot build their fleet plans around a temporary fall in jet fuel pricing. The fuel component of direct operating costs is small in comparison to other expenses. Rather the enthusiasm for used turboprops stems from the ability to use on shorter sectors to more restricted airfields. With the focus for new turboprops being on the larger capacity versions, operators also have little option but the used market. Some turboprops built in the 1970s and 1980s are in need of replacement but many operators cannot afford new equipment.

The turboprop market can be particularly price sensitive when it comes to acquiring aircraft. With far fewer passengers carried in each aircraft the difference between profit and loss is that much more fragile with a single passenger potentially determining the outcome. The utilization of turboprops can also be lower than for jets with relatively few sectors being served each day which again impacts the bottom line. There is therefore demand from a range of operators for smaller aircraft than those currently being produced. With no effective production in this segment, operators need to acquire used aircraft and the competition among buyers has resulted in generally more stable pricing.

Operators are conscious that the comparatively high cost of a new turboprop – if available – will too high when compared to operating margins and as such there is emphasis on acquiring used aircraft which may be slightly less economic. The manufacturers have focused on producing higher capacity turboprops not least because of demand but operators still need 19-50 seat aircraft which are essentially no longer manufactured.

The future market (not base – AVAC does not produce abstract base values) values – three and seven years hence from October 2018 – are expressed in current dollars, are based on the mid case current value, and include an adjustment for inflation that varies on an annual basis. The figures are for guidance only and are not intended to reflect actual recent market transactions – assuming that any exist. Rather the values represent the considered worth of the aircraft tempered by the prevailing market conditions. An Aircraft Rating, first created by AVAC more than a decade ago, is also indicated, reflecting the relative suitability of the type for asset based financing in the prevailing market conditions and over a seven-year timeframe. The values reflect aircraft based on a U.S. specification.

YEAR October 2018CURRENT VALUE FUTURE VALUE
MID LOW HIGH 2022 2025
ATR42-300. The -300 is an aircraft that has passed the test of time and consequently values are holding steady albeit at very low levels. There are now some 50 in service with 35 operators, thereby being dispersed in small fleets with no single dominant operator thereby indicating some ease of remarketing. Another 30 have been converted to freighters. There can be considerable variation in pricing due to the condition and registration. The freighter operator base is reasonably diverse with no single operator operating more than ten percent of the fleet.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1985 0.87 0.75 1.30
1987 0.96 0.82 1.43
1989 1.04 0.90 1.56
1991 1.13 0.97 1.69
1993 1.22 1.05 1.82 0.70
1995 1.30 1.12 1.95 0.75
1997 1.39 1.19 2.08 0.82 0.59
ATR42-320.The diversity of the operator base of the -320 at 65 aircraft among 44 operators indicates that the model has many admirers. The geographical distribution of the aircraft is also widespread. The aircraft is however aging. This suggests that those aircraft that in good condition will be more sought after while those in poor condition may well be scrapped. However, the low cost of those in inferior condition may see some owner/operators with sufficient maintenance resources acquire the aircraft. A total of 289 -300s/-320s/-400s were built.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D++
1988 0.88 0.53 1.28
1990 1.02 0.61 1.48
1992 1.16 0.69 1.68
1994 1.30 0.78 1.88 0.73
1996 1.43 0.86 2.08 0.82 0.59
ATR42-400. The -400 is powered by PWC121A engines offering slightly better performance for those who have specific operational requirements.
AIRCRAFT RATING D++
1996 1.56 0.98 2.19 0.86 0.60
ATR42-500.The production of new ATR42-600s is somewhat sporadic which makes sure that the -500 still has some attraction. Values of the aircraft have fallen to some extent with the youngest the most exposed due to still static new pricing. There are 134 in service with 56 operators showing a very level of diversity and therefore potential for remarketing. The ATR42-500 remained in production for nearly 15 years.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C-
1995 1.87 1.40 2.43 1.08
1997 2.69 2.02 3.50 1.59 1.16
1999 3.51 2.63 4.56 2.10 1.55
2001 4.33 3.25 5.63 2.64 1.97
2003 5.15 3.86 6.70 3.20 2.42
2005 5.97 4.48 7.76 3.79 2.90
2007 6.79 5.09 8.83 4.42 3.44
2009 7.61 5.71 9.90 5.12 4.05
2011 8.43 6.33 10.96 5.92 4.78
ATR42-600.The orders for the -600 are trickling in which is to be expected as the performance improvements over the -500 are relatively modest which leads to operators seeking the lower cost equipment. The operator base is much less widespread than for the -500. The values of new -600s is relatively static which means that the values of used -600s will fall at a faster than normal rate.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C
2012 9.56 7.17 11.86 7.03 5.73
2014 11.68 8.76 14.49 8.93 7.50
2016 13.80 10.35 17.12 10.68 9.31
2018 15.93 11.94 19.75 12.26 10.97
ATR72-200.The stretch to the ATR42 proved a resounding success although it took time to build momentum in the key U.S. market before a series of accidents saw operators move to the Bombardier Dash8 product. The aircraft is still in operation in large numbers with a sufficient spread of operators to make remarketing relative easy, at least for those in good condition and of a younger age. There have also been a number of freighter conversions.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1989 1.28 0.90 1.63
1991 1.39 0.97 1.76
1993 1.49 1.05 1.90 0.80
1995 1.60 1.12 2.03 0.86
ATR72-210.The -210 offers improved performance allowing operators to use shorter, higher, hotter runways. The type still has some attraction given the lower capital cost.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D++
1992 1.38 0.96 1.79
1994 1.50 1.05 1.95 0.82
1996 1.63 1.14 2.11 0.90 0.66
1998 1.75 1.23 2.28 0.98 0.72
ATR72-210A.The slight improvement in performance is an important consideration for specific operators. The values of the aircraft have continued to remain stable not least offering value for money for operators when compared to the cost of a new aircraft.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C–
1997 2.02 1.41 2.58 1.13 0.81
ATR72-500.The -500 may be more readily available than is desirable but the values remain reasonably stable albeit with the youngest examples facing the most significant decline. The ATR72-500 saw a considerable variation in production rates at one time making aircraft to order. But with 363 orders for the type, the aircraft continued to serve the turboprop operators well.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C++
1996 3.38 2.80 3.71 1.78 1.09
1998 4.37 3.63 4.80 2.40 1.57
2000 5.36 4.45 5.90 3.03 2.08
2002 6.35 5.27 6.99 3.68 2.60
2004 7.35 6.10 8.08 4.35 3.15
2006 8.34 6.92 9.17 5.05 3.73
2008 9.33 7.74 10.26 5.78 4.35
2010 10.32 8.57 11.35 6.56 5.03
2012 11.31 9.39 12.45 7.40 5.80
ATR72-600.Along with the -500, the -600 represents one of the key turboprops for asset based financing. While placing a number of used aircraft in one go is difficult, in more placid times the values are able to remain stable. The -600 indeed suffered during 2017 both in terms of demand and lease rentals and only is the market improving. The near 670 orders for the -600 have come at the price of nearly swamping the market as some key customers suffered. A number of carriers divested themselves of their -600 fleets either willingly or by default and this led to some entering the market with owners and lessors desperate to place the aircraft. The production rates have eased back from their highs but there still remain nearly 200 to be delivered equating to three years production.
AIRCRAFT RATING: B–
2011 11.97 10.66 12.87 7.99 6.37
2013 14.73 13.11 15.84 10.23 8.37
2015 17.49 15.56 18.80 12.48 10.49
2017 20.25 18.02 21.76 14.57 12.61
Beech B99.There are relatively few in service and a number of those that do remain in service are being used as freighters.
AIRCRAFT RATING: E+
1969 0.07 0.04 0.27
1971 0.09 0.05 0.35
1973 0.12 0.06 0.44
1975 0.14 0.07 0.52
Beech C99.The demand for the 19 seaters is always variable with good times as well as bad times. The C99 is of an age which makes placement that more difficult but maintenance is not an issue. With low capital costs they can be make money, particularly if used on service related routes. The Beech C99 offered improved performance over the B99 and with the smaller aircraft, performance is crucial.
AIRCRAFT RATING: E++
1981 0.16 0.10 0.46
1983 0.17 0.10 0.50
1985 0.19 0.11 0.54
Beech 1900C.The 1900C presented operators with slightly improved economics over the C99 but with a 19 seater there is only so much that can be improved. The market has moved on and examples can be bought for virtually loose change. The type will continue to be traded but remarketing can take considerable time and effort.
AIRCRAFT RATING: E++
1983 0.35 0.22 1.24
1985 0.41 0.26 1.44
1987 0.47 0.29 1.64
Beech 1900C-1.The -1 tweaked certain aspects but there was only so much that could be squeezed in – and that includes the passengers.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D–
1987 0.56 0.35 1.92
1989 0.63 0.39 2.16
1991 0.70 0.44 2.41
Beech 1900D.The fortunes of the 1900D have been variable with some good and not so good times but fortunately market is currently erring towards the former. The values are reasonably steady and those in better condition can command quite high prices. The standup headroom – subject to an average person – is a bonus on such a small aircraft.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D++
1992 1.22 0.84 2.45
1994 1.44 0.99 2.88 0.98
1996 1.66 1.14 3.31 1.14 0.86
1998 1.87 1.29 3.74 1.31 1.00
2000 2.09 1.44 4.17 1.48 1.15
2002 2.30 1.59 4.60 1.66 1.30
DHC6-300.The values of the Dash6 represent one of the best investments of any aircraft. The aircraft can be worth more today than when originally bought even after taking into account inflation in some cases. The very strength of the airframe and reliability of the engines, along with the ability to use the aircraft in a variety of roles has ensured that demand has remained high. The -400 is selling but this continues to have no effect on values of the -300 not least because of the disparity between the two in term of pricing.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C++
1969 1.47 1.00 2.42
1971 1.64 1.12 2.71
1973 1.82 1.24 3.00
1975 2.00 1.36 3.29
1977 2.17 1.48 3.59
1979 2.35 1.60 3.88
1981 2.53 1.72 4.17
1983 2.70 1.84 4.46
1985 2.88 1.96 4.75
1987 3.06 2.08 5.04
DHC7-100.The Dash7 was designed for specific operations that never really materialized. The aircraft was designed for use at City airports but these were few and far between and as such sales were limited. Then the efficiency of the four engines suffered as fuel prices climbed ever higher and then the cost of overhauling the four engines and propellers caused operators to seek alternatives despite the STOL capability. The aircraft is essentially no longer in service.
AIRCRAFT RATING: E-
1977 0.25 0.12 0.49
1979 0.28 0.14 0.55
1981 0.30 0.15 0.60
1983 0.33 0.17 0.66
1985 0.36 0.18 0.71
1987 0.39 0.19 0.77
DASH8-100.The all new Dash8 presented the market with a much needed improvement over previous turboprops favoring passengers with actual amenities instead of a bucket seat. The age profile of some -100s is already in excess of 30 years which is a concern in terms of seeking to operate the aircraft for say another five years. The type is facing pressure from newer variants as well as larger offerings.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D
1984 1.37 0.92 3.01
1986 1.52 1.02 3.34
1988 1.67 1.12 3.67
1990 1.82 1.22 4.00
DASH8-100A.Generally, the A and B versions denote improved performance while the Q series reflect improved noise attenuation and other improvements. Specifically, the -100A offers a restyled interior.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1992 2.92 1.87 4.82
1994 2.97 1.90 4.90 1.96
1996 3.02 1.93 4.98 2.01 1.47
DASH8Q-100A.The Q or Quiet series denotes much improvement in terms of interior noise suppression. The Q series also saw a number of other refinements that makes it more attractive when compared to earlier variants. The aircraft is likely to be in service for many more years to come and values are remaining stable as a result.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D++
1997 3.81 2.40 6.25 2.63 1.96
1999 4.00 2.52 6.55 2.80 2.10
2001 4.18 2.64 6.86 2.97 2.25
DASH8-100BThe B version provides slightly better performance and will therefore be in demand by some operators.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D
1992 3.00 1.83 6.00
1994 3.06 1.87 6.13 2.07
1996 3.13 1.91 6.25 2.13 1.58
DASH8Q-100B. The Q version is the more desirable as it provides for a more pleasurable passenger experience. Values are remaining steady. Existing operators to the type may be the most obvious targets for remarketing but there can be considerable variation in condition which still impacts values.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D++
1997 3.93 2.48 7.24 2.68 1.98
1999 4.11 2.59 7.56 2.84 2.11
2001 4.28 2.70 7.88 3.00 2.25
DASH8-200A. A total of 105 -200s were ordered and delivered and the type offers improved performance. Any improvement in capability is always attractive to those operators using the aircraft on marginal routes. The -200A offered operators the chance to use PW123C engines.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D++
1992 3.00 1.89 5.49
1994 3.13 1.97 5.72 2.09
1996 3.25 2.05 5.95 2.20 1.65
DASH8Q-200A.The fitment of a new interior and reduction in vibration provided new levels of passenger comfort. Offering the same capacity as the -100 indicates that the -200 is just as exposed to changing market forces which have increasingly favored larger aircraft but such a position ignores the need of operators to meet the same traffic needs rather than seeking larger aircraft.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C–
1997 3.96 2.38 7.93 2.69 2.03
1999 4.18 2.51 8.37 2.88 2.19
2001 4.40 2.64 8.80 3.07 2.36
DASH8-200B.The -200B provides for another incremental performance improvement over the -200A. The -200B provided an upgraded powerplant in the form of the PW123D.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C–
1992 3.16 1.97 5.78
1994 3.26 2.04 5.96 2.18
1996 3.36 2.10 6.15 2.27 1.70
DASH8Q-200B.This is the type of aircraft that potential buyers will be willing to haul out of the depths and spend considerable sums to bring back into service as such refurbishment presents the potential for at least another decade of service. The Q version of the -200B represented the latest version and values have experienced a measure of stability. Passenger weight is a constant battle for the operators of smaller aircraft and pricing may be higher.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C–
1997 4.01 2.47 7.22 2.74 2.08
1999 4.29 2.64 7.72 2.97 2.27
2001 4.57 2.81 8.23 3.21 2.47
DASH8-300.The economics of the larger -300 provided operators with the opportunity to grow without changing the basic type and thereby generate more profit. A stretch to an existing design is always more desirable than shortening as the former method contains the weight. Some 267 -300s of all guises were built before production ceased which is more than a credible number. However, the -300 is of an of age at 30 years which will see operators considering their options.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C–
1988 2.03 1.28 3.55
1990 2.06 1.29 3.60
DASH8-300A.The -300A provides for a modest improvement in performance and as such will be considered with more enthusiasm were it not for the ready available of the Q series at what are not too high prices.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C–
1992 2.97 1.99 5.05
1994 3.03 2.03 5.16 1.97
1996 3.10 2.08 5.27 2.04 1.52
DASH8Q-300AThe Q version of the 50 seater provides passengers with a few more luxuries, not least a more vibration freer experience.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C–
1997 4.66 3.12 8.21 3.06 2.32
1999 4.96 3.32 8.72 3.30 2.51
2001 5.25 3.52 9.24 3.55 2.73
DASH8-300B.The B series features a further improvement in engines albeit minor. The PW123B powerplant is used rather than the PW123A. Values are holding reasonably steady but again such is the age of the aircraft that there can be a variation in condition.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C-
1992 3.55 2.48 6.13
1994 3.62 2.54 6.27 2.32
1996 3.70 2.59 6.41 2.39 1.80
DASH8Q-300B. The Dash8-300 may no longer be in production but this may not always be the case now that Viking have taken over the program. The last variant to be built the Q-300B is still a reasonable aircraft and values can be higher – and sometimes lower – than expected if the condition is right.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C
1997 4.74 3.32 7.68 3.05 2.32
1999 5.27 3.69 8.54 3.44 2.63
2001 5.80 4.06 9.40 3.84 2.97
2003 6.33 4.43 10.26 4.27 3.33
2005 6.86 4.80 11.12 4.72 3.73
2007 7.39 5.18 11.98 5.22 4.18
DASH8Q-400The acquisition by Viking will likely breath new life into the type but there should be no illusion that for used examples there is the prospect of further value declines due to advancing age. The much more limited orderbook for the Q400 has perhaps stood it in good stead as there has not been such a surfeit of used equipment that that ATR has experienced. Production of the Q400 still runs to more than 575over nearly 20 years and this means that there are always some available. The higher capacity of the Dash8 is a positive as is the high cruise speed.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C++
2000 5.09 3.77 6.36 3.28 2.52
2002 6.55 4.84 8.18 4.29 3.34
2004 8.00 5.92 10.01 5.35 4.21
2006 9.46 7.00 11.83 6.48 5.16
2008 10.92 8.08 13.65 7.69 6.23
2010 12.37 9.16 15.47 9.04 7.46
2012 13.83 10.23 17.29 10.59 8.94
DASH8Q-400NGThe market for the -400NG may improve now that Viking is in charge but production volumes need to improve. Viking is perhaps familiar with taking used aircraft and undertaking refurbishment work which will aid the used market. With such static and even discounted new prices, there has been an adverse effect on used values. The 90 seat high density version of the aircraft is an important development and signals a clear intent to wrest some of the market away from the ATR product but thus far this has had limited success. Whether Viking has the resources to develop the Dash8 or consider a replacement remains to be seen.
AIRCRAFT RATING: B–
2010 13.00 11.05 13.98 9.36 7.42
2012 14.98 12.73 16.10 11.14 9.03
2014 16.95 14.41 18.22 13.04 10.81
2016 18.93 16.09 20.35 14.81 12.60
2018 20.91 17.77 22.47 16.39 14.39
BAe Super J31.The values and pricing of the Jetstream 32 has remained relatively flat although there can be considerable variation with much higher and much lower figures being evident. Of the 386 that were manufactured a good many are no longer in service. The Super J31 (or J32) may viewed as an aircraft of yesteryear but the type still has its advocates. The type offers low capital cost and known economics. Reliability for such an ageing aircraft is an issue but with lower utilization this may not be such an issue.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1988 0.49 0.32 1.38
1990 0.59 0.38 1.64
1992 0.68 0.44 1.90
BAe J41. There were only a limited number of J41s but not so few as might be supposed particularly when considering that few A340-600s were built. The values have of course suffered a significant fall in recent years but more recently there has been a measure of stability. There are some on the market at present and remarketing can take time. There are a number on the market including a 1996 vintage aircraft with an asking price of $1.4 million which has been advertised for many months. Only 104 were built. Values are waning by a modest amount as it to be expected.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1992 0.92 0.64 2.21
1994 0.99 0.69 2.37 0.59
1996 1.05 0.74 2.53 0.64 0.45
BAe ATP/Jetstream 61.The values of the ATP have been variable with condition playing an important part. The market for the aircraft is limited not least because only 63 were ever built and of these some 25 percent are in storage with another 25 percent having been scrapped. Others have been converted to freighter. Values are at near scrap levels which is to be expected.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1988 0.69 0.45 1.65
1990 0.78 0.51 1.87
1992 0.87 0.57 2.10
BAe ATP Freighter.The freight sector has managed to absorb some of the passenger surplus. There is some demand in this role but the ATR perhaps represents a more than viable alternative. The market is however limited and remarketing can take a while. The number of conversions remains limited.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C-
1988 1.52 1.07 3.04
1990 1.58 1.11 3.16
1992 1.64 1.15 3.29
CASA 212-200.The CASA 212 has remained on the periphery of the market to some extent. There are only a few -200s being advertised including those suited to skydiving.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D–
1980 0.11 0.06 0.33
1982 0.17 0.10 0.52
1984 0.24 0.14 0.71
1986 0.30 0.17 0.89
CASA 212-300.The better performance of the -300 provides an option for operators. The aircraft offers operators some flexibility but the preference would be for other types. Values are holding stable and pricing can be in excess of the levels indicated depending on condition – while parting out is also a possibility.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D–
1987 0.53 0.33 1.32
1989 0.67 0.42 1.66
1991 0.80 0.51 2.01
1993 0.94 0.59 2.35 0.58
1995 1.08 0.68 2.69 0.67
1997 1.22 0.77 3.04 0.77 0.57
CN235.The CN235 represented something more of a success story for CASA but the type is not very evident at major airports. A good solid aircraft but one which was more likely to be popular in the military role. The values are at levels that makes value convergence more likely. There are few on the market which makes it less of a buyers market.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D-
1988 1.45 1.04 3.48
1990 1.56 1.12 3.74
1992 1.67 1.20 4.01
1994 1.78 1.28 4.27 1.08
1996 1.89 1.36 4.54 1.16 0.84
1998 2.00 1.44 4.80 1.24 0.91
Dornier Do228-100.There are only a few on the market despite the 318 deliveries of the Do228. This represents a reasonable number for such a small aircraft. The aircraft can perform operations where support is minimal. The 228 was also produced in India under license. Values are stable and can exhibit considerable variation depending on condition.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D-
1982 0.16 0.10 0.54
1984 0.24 0.15 0.80
1986 0.32 0.19 1.07
Dornier Do228-200.The aircraft offers simplicity of operation at reasonable capital cost and there are a few on the market. Some asking prices can be higher than those indicated below though lower prices are also possible. The newer upgraded version is not having an impact.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D-
1982 0.38 0.23 1.24
1984 0.52 0.32 1.72
1986 0.67 0.41 2.20
1988 0.81 0.50 2.68
1990 0.96 0.59 3.15
1992 1.10 0.68 3.63
1994 1.25 0.77 4.11 0.83
1996 1.39 0.86 4.59 0.93 0.66
1998 1.54 0.95 5.07 1.05 0.75
Dornier 328-110The Dornier 328 has suffered over the years but values are reasonably stable today albeit at low levels again. There were 102 built with 12 scrapped and more than 30 are now in storage. This is not providing much support for values as the type has become ever less attractive. The type has become less attractive as the years have progressed.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D-
1992 1.28 0.79 3.21
1994 1.42 0.88 3.55 0.85
1996 1.56 0.97 3.90 0.95 0.68
1998 1.70 1.05 4.24 1.05 0.76
2000 1.84 1.14 4.59 1.15 0.85
Embraer EMB110 Banderainte.Values are stable but there can be a considerable variation in pricing depending on condition. The avionics may not be the most sophisticated but there are inexpensive GPS systems that can be easily added. A very good aircraft that provides the necessary performance and solid structure to provide a variety of roles but there are a large number in storage which makes for difficult remarketing unless in good condition.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D
1980 0.15 0.09 0.58
1982 0.26 0.16 1.04
1984 0.38 0.23 1.51
1986 0.49 0.30 1.97
1988 0.61 0.37 2.44
Embraer EMB120RT Brasilia.Prices are mostly holding steady as they have fallen to levels that may them attractive to newer equipment such as the Beech 1900D. There are in excess of 35 EMB120s on the market which is a sizeable number in respect of the total fleet. This is creating some variation in pricing with the quality equipment being acquired first and those in lesser condition requiring some incentive.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1985 0.73 0.42 2.18
1987 0.83 0.48 2.48
1989 0.93 0.54 2.78
1991 1.03 0.59 3.08
1993 1.12 0.65 3.37 0.73
EMB120ER Adv.The Advanced provides for better performance and is more desirable as a consequence. The Brasilia offered operators an EFIS cockpit. Even if larger aircraft are being sought the type remains a possibility for a range of operators.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1994 1.93 1.16 4.06 1.22
1996 2.03 1.22 4.27 1.30 0.94
1998 2.13 1.28 4.47 1.38 1.00
Fairchild Metro.A good aircraft for the right operator but there are ever fewer in service such is the age of the type. Replacement with newer types is continuing. The 19 seaters are still in vogue but not on the front cover. The appearance is still important as is to be expected for anything over ten years of age.
AIRCRAFT RATING: E++
1970 0.10 0.06 0.27
1972 0.11 0.07 0.31
1974 0.12 0.08 0.35
Metro II.While offering something of an advance in terms, there was only a modest improvement. The type is therefore not the most sought after of 19 seaters.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D-
1975 0.15 0.08 0.36
1977 0.17 0.10 0.43
1979 0.20 0.11 0.49
1981 0.22 0.13 0.55
Metro IIILGW.A better aircraft but the LGW is still disadvantaged. The values are at levels that makes acquisition for cash easily possible. The type is ageing and this is an issue that will make it more likely that parting out will be a choice going forward.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1981 0.29 0.17 0.71
1983 0.37 0.22 0.93
1985 0.46 0.28 1.16
1987 0.55 0.33 1.38
1989 0.64 0.38 1.60
1991 0.73 0.44 1.82
Metro IIIHGW.The Metro IIIHGW is a good aircraft that has some years of service left yet and placement is proving viable still. The HGW version is very much the more sought after and values are able to remain steady though there can be some variation depending on condition. There are always some on the market.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D++
1981 0.43 0.35 1.28
1983 0.50 0.41 1.51
1985 0.58 0.48 1.74
1987 0.66 0.54 1.97
1989 0.74 0.60 2.21
1991 0.81 0.67 2.44
Metro 23. The demand for the Metro 23 may be variable but the type still has some attraction as there are a good many routes around the world that require a 19 seater. The Metro 23 is also serving as a replacement for the myriad of 19 seaters that were delivered before the Metro 23 entered the market.
AIRCRAFT RATING: C–
1992 1.02 0.66 2.24
1994 1.20 0.78 2.64 0.79
1996 1.38 0.90 3.04 0.92 0.65
1998 1.57 1.02 3.45 1.05 0.76
2000 1.75 1.14 3.85 1.20 0.87
Fokker F27-100.The F27 continues to be something of an irrelevance in terms of asset value. Are there any in service still despite the more than 500 built?
AIRCRAFT RATING: E+
1957 0.08 0.05 0.28
1959 0.11 0.07 0.36
1961 0.13 0.08 0.44
1963 0.16 0.10 0.51
1965 0.18 0.11 0.59
1967 0.20 0.13 0.67
Fokker F27-200.The -200 provided the means of further improving payload/range performance but the market has since moved on.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D–
1959 0.13 0.05 0.34
1961 0.15 0.06 0.40
1963 0.18 0.07 0.46
1965 0.20 0.08 0.52
1967 0.22 0.09 0.58
1969 0.25 0.10 0.64
Fokker 50-100A total of 212 Fokker 50s were ordered but with 20 or more scrapped and more greater than 40 in storage, the type has had its problems in recent years. However, there is still limited demand for the aircraft and more than adequate support. A number were placed during the course of 2018.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D–
1987 0.84 0.46 1.68
1989 0.86 0.47 1.73
1991 0.89 0.49 1.77
1993 0.91 0.50 1.82 0.52
1995 0.93 0.51 1.86 0.54
Fokker 50-300The Fokker 50-300 offers improved performance and is seen as the more popular. The issue of support has been crucial for the aircraft ever since the collapse of Fokker. The type is by no means youthful and asset value is in the eye of the operator rather than the investor.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D–
1993 1.52 0.94 3.51 0.90
1995 1.62 1.01 3.73 0.97
Saab 340A.The market seems to be seeing a large number of Saab 340s on the market in one variant or another which is a concern. The age profile of the type is one reason why there are so many available.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D–
1984 0.44 0.26 1.06
1986 0.46 0.27 1.09
1988 0.47 0.28 1.13
Saab 340B.The 340B provided better performance and was more sought after. There are always a many on the market which is making it clearly a buyers market. Values are holding up slightly better than for the 340A but all things are relative for such ageing aircraft. Values need to be realistic but those in good condition may not be on the market for very long. The type has been converted to freighter which has improved its fortunes.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1989 0.91 0.50 2.00
1991 1.00 0.55 2.19
1993 1.08 0.60 2.38 0.67
1995 1.17 0.64 2.58 0.73
Saab 340BPlus.The 340BPlus is the more attractive because of yet again improved performance, so vital for the smaller capacity aircraft and this is proving to be attractive for a range of operators. The type can offer a gravel kit as well as wingtip extensions.
AIRCRAFT RATING: D+
1995 1.62 0.93 3.08 1.04
1997 1.75 1.00 3.32 1.13 0.84
1999 1.87 1.07 3.55 1.22 0.92
Saab 2000.The values of the aircraft are continuing to fall as the commercial market moves to other aircraft. With only 63 built the level of availability can easily increase as a proportion of the fleet when only a few become available. Use as a corporate transport is a viable alternative but this will take time to organize if seeking to move the aircraft from a commercial sphere.
AIRCRAFT RATING: E++
1994 1.80 1.08 3.60 1.09
1996 1.92 1.15 3.83 1.18 0.83
1998 2.03 1.22 4.07 1.26 0.91
Shorts SD330-100.With more than half of the 140 built no longer in service the market for the type is limited. The structural integrity of the SD330 is considerable and this has been its legacy. But passengers today do expect more comfort for less money.
AIRCRAFT RATING: E+
1975 0.11 0.06 0.29
1977 0.16 0.09 0.41
1979 0.21 0.12 0.54
1981 0.26 0.14 0.67
1983 0.31 0.17 0.79
Shorts 330-200. A box configuration has not been viewed as the most aerodynamic of shapes since flat surfaces create drag. The aircraft is however good for skydiving.
AIRCRAFT RATING: E++
1975 0.15 0.08 0.41
1977 0.20 0.11 0.56
1979 0.25 0.14 0.71
1981 0.31 0.17 0.86
Shorts 360-300.Values of the 360-300 remain very stable despite advancing age. There were approximately 165 ordered and a surprising number remain in service. The structure was always meant to last and lack of pressurization is a plus as it reduces fatigue. The aircraft has some attraction to operators though given its age parting out is very much an option.
AIRCRAFT RATING E++
1987 0.67 0.38 1.75
1989 0.69 0.40 1.80
1991 0.71 0.41 1.86

The figures have been extracted from the October 31st 2018 edition of semi-annual Turboprop Volume of Aircraft Values Basic, The Aircraft Value Reference 2018-2038 priced at US$1,750.00 per annum for web site access. Courtesy of The Aircraft Value Analysis Company Limited (AVAC Ltd). Tel: +44 (0) 203 468 5594. Fax: +44 (0) 203 468 5596. E-mail: sales@aircraftvalues.net. http://www.aircraftvalues.net; www.aircraftvalues.com.

THE SEARCH FOR AIRCRAFT VALUATIONS
A one-of-a-kind database filled with aircraft valuation data, including information on leasing, valuations and vital statistics, as well as Aircraft Assessment Reports.
Search an Aircraft Valuator
Error Demonstration

Live chat by BoldChat